Windows xp very slow

Hi Guys,

i am using CellProfiler on Windows XP and the interaction with the GUI becomes super-slow if there are a few of the pipeline windows open.

  • is this normal?
  • is this better on a Mac?

Cheers, Tischi

Hi Tischi,

Hopefully the latest CP release (r10997) fixed this issue? Let us know if not.

For now, the best scenario is to use Windows 64-bit with lots of RAM.

Thanks,
David

Hi,

On my computer with CP release 10997 (and earlier builds) the GUI is also extremely sluggish. Especially when the IdentifyPrimary or secondary object module is used. It actually often takes longer to display the results than to calculate them, and to zoom and pan the images is very painful. Also, if I minimize the results window and then bring it up again, it takes a really long time to redraw it.
This is on a quad core computer with 4GB RAM running Win XP.

cheers,
Karl

Hi Karl,

Simple question: How big are your images in this case? (By which I mean pixel dimensions).

Regards,
-Mark

Hi Mark,

The images are approximately 2000x1500 pixels, so they are quite large. However, even if I crop them to 500x500 pixels, the GUI is very slow.

cheers,
Karl

Hi Karl,

Are you cropping the image inside or outside of CellProfiler? Also, are the images color and converted to grayscale, or grayscale natively? If the answer is the former for either or both, part of the problem may be that the full-size and/or color image is still being held in memory even though later modules are only working on the cropped image. Perhaps putting a ConserveMemory module at the appropriate place my help on this matter?

Regards,
-mark

Hi Mark,

Those are gray scale images, and yes, I did the cropping in Cellprofiler, but used PreserveMemory afterwards. I don’t understand why the GUI would be slower because more images are kept in memory? My guess is that it’s something that happens when the GUI window is being drawn on screen, e.g. that the original image + results images are being scaled down to the window resolution, and that it’s that scaling process that takes such a long time.

cheers,
Karl

Thanks for the clarification. I would say that your guess is on the right track. If you close/hide the windows that display the original image, does that speed things up?
-Mark