Support for Bi-Level Tiff/BigTiff?

bio-formats
imagej
plugin

#1

Does anyone know of a plugin that supports read/write of bi-level Tiff/BigTiff? ImageJ and Bio-Formats seem more than happy to read them but I can’t figure out how to save to them. As far as I can tell, saving with ImageJ built-ins converts to 8-bit grayscale and saving using Bio-Formats converts to colormap (16-bit). I would be happy to be wrong on this but it seems like there isn’t a way to save as bi-levels.


#2

Good day Andrew,

please see:
http://forum.image.sc/t/threshold-output-1-bit-g4-tiff/8367/2?u=herbie

Regards

Herbie


#3

I saw that but I am not looking for compression, just uncompressed 1-bit Tiffs.


#4

Andrew,

did you visit the “Image I/O” website?

Best

Herbie


#5

Yes. It didn’t say anything about uncompressed. However, I downloaded the plugin and it claims to offer it in the dialog. Sorry for the nuisance. Thanks for your help as always.


Edit:

I may need to take that back for a bit. I just actually tried it and it seems that the “None” compression option also prevents converting to 1-bit. In fact, my saved image (and I tried a few times) was actually a few MB larger than the 8-bit grayscale. Of course, this issue is something I need to bring up with the plugin writers not here.


#6

Andrew,

you may use Photoshop or a less expensive alternative …

Regards

Herbie


#7

I already tried with MatLab (it isn’t less expensive but our organization already has a license agreement). I can get pretty close but there are a few header values it won’t let me edit. Consequently, the headers are, strictly speaking, invalid and successful reading of the file depends on the diligence of the reading program.


#8

Good day Andrew,

perhaps a final thought regarding the topic …

I guess that the main idea behind formats that respect the binary nature of images is file size. If so, why not save ImageJ (binary-valued) TIF-images as Zip files by using “File >> Save As >> Zip…”. ZIP compression is lossless and with 8bit but binary-valued input images produces very small files that ImageJ opens without any further processing (drag & drop etc.).

The only drawback with this method is, that some applications, notably Photoshop, doesn’t directly open zip-compressed TIF-files, i.e. you have to un-zip them first.

Regards

Herbie


#9

I guess so. But as you yourself pointed out, not a lot of applications can directly read ZIP.